DETROIT -- Rockies shortstop Troy Tulowitzki will visit noted sports hernia surgeon Dr. William Meyers in Philadelphia on Monday in an attempt to determine the exact nature of the pain he's experiencing in the left groin area.

Meyers performed sports hernia surgeries on Rangers star Josh Hamilton, as well as football players Donovan McNabb and Jeremy Shockey, and hockey player Tomas Holmstrom. Meyers will look at Tulowitzki's two previous MRIs and conduct his own examination.

Tulowitzki hasn't played since May 30 with what has been listed as a left groin strain. On Wednesday, he had to leave his first injury rehab game for Triple-A Colorado Springs because of pain in the area.

It is not certain that Tulowitzki has a sports hernia, or if so, which of the many types of sports hernias it may be. Even if it is a sports hernia, it doesn't automatically have to be surgically repaired. Rockies head athletic trainer Keith Dugger said the club is acting on a recommendation to have Tulowitzki looked at again.

Sports hernias are diagnosed almost exclusively in high-level male athletes, and usually occur with athletes who battle chronic groin pain.

The Rockies will play in Philadelphia next Tuesday-Thursday. Tulowitzki's evaluation will occur on Monday, the club's off-day.

Tulowitzki is hitting .287 with eight home runs and 27 RBIs in 47 games. He had a narrow lead over the Cardinals' Rafael Furcal in the latest update of voting for the National League's starting lineup in next month's All-Star Game.

De La Rosa to have elbow re-examined

DETROIT -- Rockies left-hander Jorge De La Rosa will have his left elbow re-examined Wednesday by Angels team medical director Dr. Lewis Yocum, the same surgeon who performed Tommy John ligament transfer surgery in the elbow last June.

De La Rosa's injury rehab assignment has been halted twice, first because of left forearm tightness and then because of fluid in the elbow.

Rockies head athletic trainer Keith Dugger said the checkup with Yocum is not because of a major issue, but to merely make sure it is OK for him to continue his rehab.

Before the first setback, De La Rosa was on pace to return in early June. However, the Rockies said all along that setbacks are not unusual.

Injured Rox at various stages of rehab

DETROIT -- Rockies right-hander Juan Nicasio, currently on the 15-day disabled list with a left knee strain, threw a 25-pitch bullpen session on Thursday, meaning his progress is coming along slightly faster than expected.

Nicasio is eligible to return Monday, but he's almost certain to go to Triple-A Colorado Springs on a rehab assignment before rejoining the rotation.

Also, right-hander Jhoulys Chacin, who hasn't thrown since May 1 because of a nerve injury in his chest, is throwing aggressively at 120 feet on flat ground and is making progress, although it isn't certain when he will begin throwing bullpen sessions.

Infielder Jonathan Herrera, who had his injury rehab assignment for a right hamstring strain halted recently because of shoulder pain, is improving and could resume playing in Minor League games in the next couple of days, Rockies manager Jim Tracy said.

Rockies sign four more picks from Draft

DETROIT -- The Rockies announced Friday that they signed four more picks from the 2012 First-Year Player Draft, including outfielder Max White, the second-round pick out of Williston High School (Fla.).

White, the 73rd overall pick -- who batted .407 with four home runs and 23 RBIs his final high school season -- signed for a $1 million bonus, MLB.com has learned. White had signed a scholarship offer from Florida.

The Rockies also announced the signings of catcher Tom Murphy, a third-round pick from the University at Buffalo; catcher Wilfredo Rodriguez, a seventh-round pick from the Puerto Rico Baseball Academy; and first baseman Correlle Prime, a 12th-round pick from Manatee High School (Fla.). The Rockies have signed 28 picks, including each of the top six.

Worth noting

• Rockies infielder DJ LeMahieu was born in California but attended high school in the Detroit area at Brother Rice. The school is known for football and basketball, but LeMahieu is the first of the school's athletes to play in the Majors. Brother Rice planned an alumni gathering at Friday's game, in part to cheer on LeMahieu.